West Way Education

Finland

Universites

University of Helsinki. Finland

Aalto University. Finland 

University of Turku. Finland

Tampere University. Finland

University of Oulu. Finland

University of Eastern Finland. Finland

University of Jyvaskyla. Finland

Lappeenranta University of Technology. Finland

And other universities and universities of applied science in Finland

Vocational training

Vocational education and training are very practically-oriented and provide the student with the necessary skills for working life. The education and training are intended for young people completing their basic education and for adults who are already working. After vocational education and training, you can start working or apply to a higher education institute.

  • Studying in vocational education and training
  • Applying for vocational education and training
  • Vocational qualifications
  • On-the-job learning
  • Preparatory education for programmes leading to an upper secondary qualification TUVA

In vocational education and training, you can study the following fields:

In addition to vocational education and training, you can also apply to general upper secondary school after comprehensive school. You can also complete a double degree by studying at a vocational institute and general upper secondary school at the same time. Read more about general upper secondary schools on the InfoFinland page General upper secondary school.

Bachelers & Masters Visa ​

DIRECTLY FOR THE ENTIRE DURATION OF STUDIES

After your graduation, you may apply for a residence permit to look for work or start a business. You’ll have the option for this two-year post-study permit for five years after graduation, and you can also take the permit in parts if you like. Similar two-year permit options are also open for you, if you have conducted research or have completed your doctoral degree in Finland. If you are a student’s family member, you can apply for a residence permit for Finland based on family ties.

If you come from outside the EU/EEA area, you usually need a student residence permit in order to come and carry out degree studies in Finland. Your first student residence permit for bachelor’s or master’s studies in Finland can be granted to you for the entire duration of your studies, provided your passport is valid through the whole of that period. The permit allows you to work for a maximum of 30 hours per week. If your work is related to your degree (for example, practical training or thesis work) then this 30-hour restriction does not apply.

Note that if you are coming to Finland to conduct Doctoral studies or research, you should apply for a residence permit for scientific research instead. A first residence permit for research can be granted for a maximum of two years.

General Information

After your graduation, you may apply for a residence permit to look for work or start a business. You’ll have the option for this two-year post-study permit for five years after graduation, and you can also take the permit in parts if you like. Similar two-year permit options are also open for you, if you have conducted research or have completed your doctoral degree in Finland.

Accomedation

You have two main options when searching for accommodation: established student housing foundations and the private market.

Student housing providers are listed on the SOA (Finnish Student Housing Ltd.) website. The average monthly rent for a single room in a shared student flat ranges from around €160 – €380. Single apartments or family flats are also available, but the rent is likely to be higher in these non-shared apartments and they often have long waiting lists.

You can also arrange housing independently by searching for rented flats on the open market, or on social media. Open market flats tend to be more expensive than those available via student housing foundations.

It is also a good idea to ask the university you have been admitted to for advice on the other locally available student accommodation alternatives. Check the related information on the website of your Finnish university or UAS.

Economy

The economy of Finland is a highly industrialised, mixed economy with a per capita output similar to that of western European economies such as France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. The largest sector of Finland’s economy is its service sector, which contributes 72.7% to the country’s gross domestic product (GDP); followed by manufacturing and refining at 31.4%; and concluded with the country’s primary sector at 2.9%.[22][23]
Finland’s key economic sector is manufacturing. The largest industries[24] are electronics (21.6% – very old data), machinery, vehicles and other engineered metal products (21.1%), forest industry (13.1%), and chemicals (10.9%). Finland has timber and several mineral and freshwater resources. Forestry, paper factories, and the agricultural sector (on which taxpayers spend around 2 billion euro annually) are politically sensitive to rural residents. The Greater Helsinki area generates around a third of GDP.[25]

Culture

The culture of Finland combines indigenous heritage, as represented for example by the country’s national languages Finnish (a Uralic language) and Swedish (a Germanic language), and the sauna, with common Nordicand European cultural aspects. Because of its history and geographic location, Finland has been influenced by the adjacent areas, various Finnic and Baltic peoples as well as the former dominant powers of Sweden and Russia. Finnish culture is built upon the relatively ascetic environmental realities, traditional livelihoods, and heritage of egalitarianism (e.g. Everyman’s right, universal suffrage) and the traditionally widespread ideal of self-sufficiency (e.g. predominantly rural lifestyles and modern summer cottages).

There are cultural differences among the various regions of Finland, especially minor differences in dialect. Minorities, some of which have a status recognised by the state, such as the Sami, Swedish-speaking Finns, Karelians, Romani, Jews, and Tatars, maintain their cultural identities within Finland. Many Finns are emotionally connected to the countryside and nature, as large-scale urbanisation is a relatively recent phenomenon.

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